Tuesday
10am - 5pm
Wednesday
10am - 5pm
Thursday
10am - 5pm
Friday
10am - 5pm
Saturday
10am - 5pm
Sunday
12pm - 5pm

Tuesday - Saturday, 10am-5pm
Sunday, 12pm - 5pm.
The gallery and cafe are closed on Mondays.

Closed Today
Tuesday
10am - 5pm
Wednesday
10am - 5pm
Thursday
10am - 5pm
Friday
10am - 5pm
Saturday
10am - 5pm
Sunday
12pm - 5pm

Tuesday - Saturday, 10am-5pm
Sunday, 12pm - 5pm.
The gallery and cafe are closed on Mondays.

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“I am not a painter in the strictest sense… I am a political strategist who uses a visual language to encourage conversation, argument, change”- Lubaina Himid

Be part of this dynamic event about the future of art education in secondary schools. Join artist and educator Lubaina Himid and collaborators to explore how learning to think like artists can open up fresh ways for young people to perceive the world and their place in it.

This event series asks what ideas could be taught in schools to demonstrate the power of art and equality, and how we can better share and discuss the concern that art is as much about her-stories as his-stories.

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Free!

Lubaina Himid

Lubaina Himid’s career as an artist, curator and scholar has been central to rethinking the Western canon of art history and museological practices over the past 30 years. Born in Zanzibar in 1954, and moving to England shortly afterwards, her education includes a Masters in Cultural History at the Royal College of Art in London with a graduating thesis titled Young Black Artists in Britain Today, anticipating her involvement in the Black Arts Movement of the 1980s and 90s. Himid went on to organise a number of group exhibitions throughout the 1980s, including Five Black Women at the Africa Centre, London (1983), The Thin Black Line at ICA, London (1985), and Unrecorded Truths at the Elbow Room (1986), which brought to public attention her own generation of black female artists, questioning the limits of their creative visibility in the process. Her own work challenges these boundaries, as seen in her solo show Revenge, featuring consecutive paintings of black women protagonists and memorials to the horrors of the transatlantic slave trade, at Rochdale Art Gallery and the South Bank Centre, London, in 1992, which contested the pictorial narratives so frequently repeated in art history. She completed a residency at Tate St Ives between 1998 and 2000, and has participated in a number of group exhibitions including Uncomfortable Truths: The Shadow of Slave Trading on Contemporary Art at the V&A, London, in 2007, and more recently, Migrations at Tate Britain, Keywords at the International Institute of Visual Arts and Tate Liverpool (2013/14) and Burning Down the House at the Gwangju Biennale, South Korea (2014). In addition to her prolific artistic practice, she holds the position of Professor of Contemporary Art at the University of Central Lancashire, where she leads the interdisciplinary visual art research project Making Histories Visible, reflecting critically on the success and failures of the Black Arts Movement and participating in numerous conferences on art of the diasporas. Revisiting her earlier work, she staged Thin Black Lines in 2011 at Tate Britain with curator Paul Goodwin, and has produced a series of research documentaries including Open Sesame (2005) and The Point of Collection (2007), in collaboration with Tate Liverpool.