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Tuesday - Saturday, 10am-5pm
Sunday, 12pm - 5pm.
The gallery and cafe are closed on Mondays.

Open Today 10am - 5pm
Monday
Closed
Tuesday
10am - 5pm
Wednesday
10am - 5pm
Thursday
10am - 5pm
Friday
10am - 5pm
Saturday
10am - 5pm
Sunday
12pm - 5pm

Tuesday - Saturday, 10am-5pm
Sunday, 12pm - 5pm.
The gallery and cafe are closed on Mondays.

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From a prototype domestic wallpaper which is designed to reveal itself in response to internal air pollutionto a large sculptural ‘lung’ made from a pioneering organic building material, Future Knowledge is a thought-provoking new exhibition that will explore the role of visual culture in raising awareness about climate change.

Building upon the ambition of last year’s inaugural edition of Future Knowledge (20 May – 25 June 2017), over five weeks Modern Art Oxford will be transformed into a public studio – a space where questions are asked, ideas are shared, and future possibilities imagined. Bringing together artworks, prototypes and projects by artists, designers and thinkers from a wide range of different disciplines, this unique exhibition will showcase a fascinating and diverse range of creative responses to environmental concerns. In particular, it will ask: how can artistic inquiry and creative ecological design generate new perspectives on climate change?

Climate change has already had a measurable impact on the environment, which scientists agree has most likely been caused by human activity since the mid-twentieth century. There has been a significant global temperature increase in recent years, causing warming oceans, melting ice sheets and increasingly frequent extreme weather events. Future Knowledge will acknowledge these facts and help raise further awareness of environmental concerns, but it will also celebrate the possibility that creativity and ingenuity in current and future generations can bring about a positive change.

Future Knowledge is part of the nationwide project, Season for Change, which invites artists and arts organisations from across the country to explore climate change through creative presentation.

Featured Artists

Lucy Kimbell

Artist, designer, researcher and educator, Lucy Kimbell is the current director of the innovation insights hub at University of the Arts London and associate fellow at Saïd Business School, University of Oxford. Kimbell’s research-based art practice aims to critically explore the ways in which design can influence policy-making and social innovation. An artist as well as a designer, Kimbell has exhibited internationally, including in the interdisciplinary exhibition Making Things Public (2005) curated by Bruno Latour and Peter Weibel and at TEDGlobal (2011).

Tania Kovats

London-born Tania Kovats is renowned for her large-scale installations, sculptures and temporal works – often displayed within the public realm - which explore our understanding and experience of the landscape. She is well known for her permanent installation Tree at the Natural History Museum, commissioned to mark the 2009 bicentenary of Charles Darwin. Kovats has held numerous major solo exhibitions, including at Pippy Houldsworth Gallery, London (2015); The Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh (2014) and Yorkshire Sculpture Park (2008). Her work is held in numerous collections including the Arts Council, The V&A and The British Council.  

Eline McGeorge

Norwegian artist Eline McGeorge’s research and art practice is motivated by enquiries into environmental issues, democratic problems, feminist legacies and science fiction. These themes are brought together through drawing, collage, animation, weaving and artist books. Since completing her Masters in Fine Art at Goldsmiths, University of London in 2000, she has had various international solo exhibitions including at Oslo Kunstforening, Hollybush Gardens, London; Gallery Kirkhoff, Copenhagen and Fotogalleriet, Oslo. McGeorge has carried out residencies at Camden Arts Centre, London and Delfina Studios, Prague.

Eve Mutso

Celebrated Estonian dancer and choreographer, Eve Mutso is the former principal dancer of Scottish Ballet. Since becoming freelance, Mutso has developed her successful career as a classical and contemporary dancer and as a professional choreographer. She is renowned for taking on the technically challenging role of ‘Blanche’ in the Scottish Ballet’s acclaimed A Streetcar Named Desire, which won an Olivier Award for Best New Dance Production and a South Bank Award for Dance, receiving critical acclaim worldwide. Mutso has regularly danced and choreographed as part of Edinburgh Fringe Festival and has also performed in various short dance films including Death as a New Beginning (2013) and A Dancer’s Journey (2016). She has been nominated for the Critics Circle National Dance Awards on three occasions.

Andy Owen

Born into a rural Shropshire farming community, Andy Owen’s practice explores issues surrounding sustainability and the contemporary countryside. Often constructed from recycled or found materials, Owen’s works seek to engage us with questions about our own actions and the impact we have on our environment both locally and in the wider world. Solo exhibitions include The Long Way Home (2016) at South Street Gallery, Oxford; Fish Island Tree, a commission for Hackney Wicked Festival (2014), and Metorama at Degree Art, Vyner Street, London (2010). In 2006, Owen was a winning finalist in the nationwide Mercury Art Prize.

Rachel Sussman

Rachel Sussman is a Guggenheim, NYFA, and MacDowell Colony Fellow, and two-time TED speaker. Her exhibition record spans more than a decade in museums and galleries in the US, Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. Combining art, science, and philosophy, Sussman’s critically acclaimed, decade-long project “The Oldest Living Things in the World “resulted in a successful touring exhibition and New York Times bestselling book. In 2014 she began developing new installation work, deepening her explorations of personal and cosmic time, the universe, nature, philosophy, and beauty. With the support of the LACMA Lab, and working with SpaceX, NASA, and CERN, her subsequent work has been shown at MASS MoCA, the New Museum Los Gatos, the Des Moines Art Center, and the forthcoming Taipei Biennial. She is also an artist in residence with the SETI Institute. Sussman is additionally a student of shamanic healing modalities.

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