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Tuesday - Saturday, 10am-5pm
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The gallery and cafe are closed on Mondays.

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Monday
Closed
Tuesday
10am - 5pm
Wednesday
10am - 5pm
Thursday
10am - 5pm
Friday
10am - 5pm
Saturday
10am - 5pm
Sunday
12pm - 5pm

Tuesday - Saturday, 10am-5pm
Sunday, 12pm - 5pm.
The gallery and cafe are closed on Mondays.

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This exhibition offers a rare opportunity to see a significant early conceptual work by Christian Boltanski.

Under Boltanski’s instructions, Peter Ibsen, former Director of Modern Art Oxford, photographed all the belongings of a typical resident of the city.

The presentation of these photographs – in Oxford for the first time since 1973 – forms an ongoing series of exhibitions that revisit moments from Modern Art Oxford’s distinguished history in the lead up to the gallery’s 50th anniversary in 2016.

Download the Exhibition Notes here: Christian Boltanski Exhibition Notes

Christian Boltanski

Boltanski (b. 1944) is a French sculptor, photographer, painter and filmmaker. Self-taught, he began painting in 1958 but first came to public attention in the late 1960s with short avant-garde films and with the publication of notebooks in which he came to terms with his childhood. The combination in these works of real and fictional evidence of his and other people's existence remained central to his later art. In the 1970s photography became Boltanski's favoured medium for exploring forms of remembering and consciousness, reconstructed in pictorial terms. In the early 1980s Boltanski ceased using objets trouvés as a point of departure. Instead he produced ‘theatrical compositions' by fashioning small marionette-like figures from cardboard, scraps of materials, thread and cork, painted in colour and transposed photographically into large picture formats. These led to kinetic installations in which a strong light focused on figurative shapes helped create a mysterious environment of silhouettes in movement. In 1986 Boltanski began making installations from a variety of materials and media, with light effects as integral components. Such works, for which he used portrait photographs of Jewish schoolchildren taken in Vienna in 1931, serve as a forceful reminder of the mass murder of Jews by the Nazis. In the works that followed Boltanski filled whole rooms and corridors with items of worn clothing as a way of prompting an involuntary association with the clothing depots at concentration camps. As in his previous work, objects thus serve as mute testimony to human experience and suffering. [Reference: Tate]