Monday
Closed
Tuesday
10am - 5pm
Wednesday
10am - 5pm
Thursday
10am - 5pm
Friday
10am - 5pm
Saturday
10am - 5pm
Sunday
12pm - 5pm

Tuesday - Saturday, 10am-5pm
Sunday, 12pm - 5pm.
The gallery and cafe are closed on Mondays.

Open Today 10am - 5pm
Monday
Closed
Tuesday
10am - 5pm
Wednesday
10am - 5pm
Thursday
10am - 5pm
Friday
10am - 5pm
Saturday
10am - 5pm
Sunday
12pm - 5pm

Tuesday - Saturday, 10am-5pm
Sunday, 12pm - 5pm.
The gallery and cafe are closed on Mondays.

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Inspired by the technology behind Kiki Smith’s tapestries, the Creative Space plays host to a Loom Computer Synthesiser created by Owl Project, allowing you to connect a loom to electronic sound.

Come along to the Creative Space to weave your own patterns and create your own electronic soundtrack using punch cards.

Inspired by their 2014 Barnaby Festival commission to create a work for Paradise Mill – one of Macclesfield’s silk museums – Owl Project have created a Loom Computer Synthesiser. It simulates how the jacquard loom used punch cards to make patterned cloth, and explores what happens if you try to connect a jacquard loom to electronic sound-making technology.

Free, open to all.

Owl Project

Owl Project is an art collective formed by Simon Blackmore, Antony Hall and Steve Symons. They work with wood and electronics to fuse sculpture and sound art, creating music making machines, interfaces and objects which intermix pre-steam and digital technologies.

Drawing on influences such as 70s synthesiser culture, DIY woodworking and current digital crafts, the resulting artwork is a quirky and intriguing critique of the allure and production of technology. Owl Project make a distinctive range of musical and sculptural instruments that question human interaction with computer interfaces and our increasing appetite for new and often disposable technologies.

Notable works include 2012 Cultural Olympiad commission ~Flow, a large-scale floating installation which sonified the flow and salinity of the River Tyne using a range of hand-crafted machines, and the iLog, commissioned by Crafts Council UK. They are based in Rogue studios, Manchester UK.

"Post Pansonic uppercase electronica" The Wire magazine, Nov, 2008

“The Owl Project are a wonderful combination of inventiveness, precision, lateral thinking and single-minded quirkiness” Tim Marlow, White Cube Gallery 2009

https://www.owlproject.com