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Tuesday - Saturday, 10am-5pm
Sunday, 12pm - 5pm.
The gallery and cafe are closed on Mondays.

Open Today 10am - 5pm
Monday
Closed
Tuesday
10am - 5pm
Wednesday
10am - 5pm
Thursday
10am - 5pm
Friday
10am - 5pm
Saturday
10am - 5pm
Sunday
12pm - 5pm

Tuesday - Saturday, 10am-5pm
Sunday, 12pm - 5pm.
The gallery and cafe are closed on Mondays.

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Have you ever thought about how art may change and shape your view of other people?

For the final Saturday of the acclaimed exhibition Fantastic Cities, join artist Penny Woolcock, neuroscientists and youth workers for a powerful and timely discussion about the escalating youth violence in UK cities. The discussion will be chaired by neuroscientist Daniel Glaser, author of the Guardian’s A Neuroscientist Explains and Founding Director of Science Gallery London, where young people shape the programme.

Woolcock will speak about the intriguing story behind the making of The Same Road is a Different Road which is a central film in the exhibition at Modern Art Oxford.  The work presents the startlingly different thoughts and decisions of two individual narratives on a short walk through the same city streets, one by the artist and the other by a teenager involved in youth violence. For one the streets are a battleground where “you’d better look over your shoulder” because of deadly threats around every corner; for the other, the area is liberating, populated by “gastropubs selling Prosecco on tap, shops and cafes, Sadler’s Wells … my friends”.

The artist will be joined by Stephen Griffith, Project Director of the Copenhagen Youth Project, who will share his knowledge of working with local teenagers in North London. He co-wrote, with the artist, the text City as a War Zone which formed the basis of the film The Same Road is a Different Road.

Patricia L Lockwood from the Department of Experimental Psychology at Oxford University will explain some of the science behind our decision making and offer a fascinating insight into how individual differences in social cognition, such as empathy, determine our ability to do this.

A unique creative response to the discussion will be performed by Malik Sankara, a collaborator of Woolcock’s who features in Fantastic Cities.

Emma Ridgway, Head of Programme, Chief Curator at Modern Art Oxford will introduce the event and explain how it forms part of an art research project that will include making a new film with young people in Oxford.

You can see a short film about Penny Woolcock and her work here.

Find out more about Penny Woolcock: Fantastic Cities here.

The Same Road is a Different Road is supported by the Wellcome Trust.